I Get Where Veganism Starts, But Where Does It End?

by sjbgilmour

Okay, now before I begin, just let me point out I’m not attacking vegans.  Not in slightest.  I don’t agree with them, but that has bugger all to do with this little piece.  I don’t agree with socialists, or just about every form of organised religion in which fanatical zealots are groomed either, but, like I said, I’m not attacking them.  Vegans, zealots, pinko commie bastards…  … they can all go their merry way and I’ll not lift a finger against them unless they try to shove their point of view down my throat.  Then we’d have a problem, but I digress…

Vegans used to be fringe dwellers.  Now, they’re pretty-much mainstream.  That’s fine.  I think I get veganism as a general ethic; don’t eat anything that was once a living animal, or came from an animal.  No meat, poultry, or seafood.  No dairy.  Okay, that’s cool.  But these can all be seen with the naked eye.

What if we look though a lens?  Take bread and beer.  They both use yeast.  Wine also uses a fermentation process where a living organism turns sugar to alcohol, and then dies in the process.  And don’t even start me on tofu or soy yoghurts.  The whole process is riddled with bacteria.

See the bubbles in the gunk in that jar?  (It’s not my jar, by the way.  I found the pic online, and pinched it for this post.).  That’s the gaseous byproduct (basically yeast farts), of yeast bacteria consuming flour, while living in the mixture of flour and water.  It’s a living thing, guys.  I have a similar, through less photogenic, container of gunk in my fridge.  We call it Walter.  I can tell by his smell, and viscosity how his health is.  I feed him every few days with more water and more flour.  He gets a mix of rye, wholemeal, and white flour.   Then, on weekends, I bake sourdough bread, and sometimes pizza bases for home-made pizza night.

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Why do we call him Walter?  Well, one day I was describing how he lives, my youngest daughter, who had just recently been reading the series of books by William Kotzwinkle and  Glenn Murray, about a flatulent dog called Walter.  Miss5’s  (now6,), eyes lit up and she exclaimed ‘Like Walter The Farting Dog!’   Here’s another pic I nicked for this post:
yeast
Now, if wanted really not eat animals, or animal bi-products, I think I’d have tough decision to make when it comes to yeast.  It’s certainly not a plant.  Sure, it’s only a very simple organism, but it’s alive, and usually killed in the process of making some our foods like this:

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I baked these loaves of light rye on Sunday.  They’re my lunch bread for this week.  Just food for thought…

Sam

 

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